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However, there is more to {{Cost|P}} costs than just the notion that {{Cost|2}} < {{Cost|P}} < {{Cost|3}}; cards costing {{Cost|XP}} are in general much harder to gain than cards costing {{Cost|X}}+{{Cost|2}}-and-a-half or so. Since you don't start with a Potion in your deck, you can't [[open]] with a {{Cost|P}}-costing card and thus usually can't have one in hand till turn 5 at the earliest; since Potion costs {{Cost|4}} you can't open with two Potions, and thus can't even usually ''gain'' your second {{Cost|P}}-costing card before turn 5. Moreover, having Potion in your deck is itself usually ultimately a liability: the only [[Victory card]] Potions can buy is {{Card|Vineyard}}, and when it comes time to buy {{Card|Province|Provinces}} the Potion is essentially a [[dead]] card in your deck.
 
However, there is more to {{Cost|P}} costs than just the notion that {{Cost|2}} < {{Cost|P}} < {{Cost|3}}; cards costing {{Cost|XP}} are in general much harder to gain than cards costing {{Cost|X}}+{{Cost|2}}-and-a-half or so. Since you don't start with a Potion in your deck, you can't [[open]] with a {{Cost|P}}-costing card and thus usually can't have one in hand till turn 5 at the earliest; since Potion costs {{Cost|4}} you can't open with two Potions, and thus can't even usually ''gain'' your second {{Cost|P}}-costing card before turn 5. Moreover, having Potion in your deck is itself usually ultimately a liability: the only [[Victory card]] Potions can buy is {{Card|Vineyard}}, and when it comes time to buy {{Card|Province|Provinces}} the Potion is essentially a [[dead]] card in your deck.
  
For this reason, a major component of the strategy of Potion games lies in deciding whether the value of the powerful cards you can buy ''with'' Potion is worth the cost of weakening your deck by adding to it a Potion that won't help you buy Provinces, and of the fact that the construction of your deck is delayed by the amount of time it can take to acquire the powerful {{Cost|P}}-costing cards.
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For this reason, a major component of the strategy of Potion games lies in deciding whether the value of the powerful cards you can buy ''with'' Potion is worth the [[opportunity cost]] of weakening your deck by adding to it a Potion that won't help you buy Provinces, and of the fact that the construction of your deck is delayed by the amount of time it can take to acquire the powerful {{Cost|P}}-costing cards.
  
 
These drawbacks are compensated for in part by the fact that {{Cost|P}}-costing cards are in general ''very'' powerful. For instance, {{Card|Vineyard}} and {{Card|Philosopher's Stone}} can be worth, respectively, insane amounts of {{VP}} and {{Cost|}} in decks properly constructed around them; and with sufficient [[trashing]], an [[engine]] built around {{Card|Scrying Pool}} or {{Card|Alchemist}} can regularly draw your whole deck with a high degree of consistency. Moreover, {{Cost|P}}-costing cards are generally designed so that decks that benefit from gaining them benefit from gaining ''multiple copies'' of them—the majority of them are [[non-terminal]] Actions, one is a Treasure, and one is a Victory card—so it is rare that you find yourself buying a Potion that you only want to use once; whenever you draw your Potion, you're usually happy to buy another copy of whatever {{Cost|P}}-costing card made you want to buy the Potion in the first place.
 
These drawbacks are compensated for in part by the fact that {{Cost|P}}-costing cards are in general ''very'' powerful. For instance, {{Card|Vineyard}} and {{Card|Philosopher's Stone}} can be worth, respectively, insane amounts of {{VP}} and {{Cost|}} in decks properly constructed around them; and with sufficient [[trashing]], an [[engine]] built around {{Card|Scrying Pool}} or {{Card|Alchemist}} can regularly draw your whole deck with a high degree of consistency. Moreover, {{Cost|P}}-costing cards are generally designed so that decks that benefit from gaining them benefit from gaining ''multiple copies'' of them—the majority of them are [[non-terminal]] Actions, one is a Treasure, and one is a Victory card—so it is rare that you find yourself buying a Potion that you only want to use once; whenever you draw your Potion, you're usually happy to buy another copy of whatever {{Cost|P}}-costing card made you want to buy the Potion in the first place.

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